Welcome to our Blog, FROGS ARE GREEN!

posted in: Frog Conservation | 33

For over 200 million years, ponds, marshes, grasslands, and rain forests have come alive with the calls of frogs. Yet these remarkable and colorful animals are declining at such a rapid rate that they are being called the Earth’s next dinosaurs. According to the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, a third of the world’s amphibian species are threatened with extinction.

World-renowned Harvard biologist E.O. Wilson has written in the book, The Creation: An Appeal to Save Life on Earth:

Kermit the Frog, to summarize the situation in a phrase, is sick. And to varying degrees so is much of the living world. Might Homo sapiens follow? Maybe, maybe not. But with certainty we are the great meteorite of our time, having begun the sixth mass extinction of Phanerozoic history. We are creating a less stable and interesting place for our descendants to inherit.

Frogs are threatened by habitat loss, global warming, pollution, and disease. Because they breathe and drink through their skin, they are extremely sensitive to an unhealthy environment. Chemicals, pesticides, ozone, and UV are dangerous, even deadly, to them.

We called our blog FROGS ARE GREEN because we believe that healthy frogs mean a healthy planet. By saving the frogs, we will also save our planet—and ourselves.

Please hop in and get involved. We’d love to hear from you!

33 Responses

  1. Thank you for this site.
    My partner and I have an organic vegetable farm… with a big pond. A couple of weeks ago we took a break beside the bank of the pond and were watching a blasted bullfrog sitting near the edge. I had just made the comment, “We have to do something about these bullfrogs, they’ve eaten all the indigenous frogs… I can’t remember the last time I saw a regular frog.” No sooner were the words out of my mouth and the bullfrog jumped and grabbed the head of a 2 foot snake! The poor snake (who thought s/he was going to dine on little frogs) wrapped its body around the bullfrog, but the big frog just kept pulling it under the water… my partner ran down the steep bank, thinking he was going to save the snake… to no avail. These bullfrogs have taken over the area unfortunately, and they have ravenous appetites. Not only do they eat the little frogs, they eat small birds, ducklings and even each other. We certainly need to turn this around and save our indigenous frog species.

    • Thanks, Nicole, for your comment! You raise a good point–bullfrogs are considered an invasive species in many parts of the country, and in some areas are wiping out local frog populations. I’ll do some research about this and write a post about it.

  2. Can you blog a bit about snakes and frogs? We have a beautiful totally natural lily pond in our landscape, with a perfect window view from our dining room. I am in love with the frog that has appeared there. But worried about a garden snake who also recently appeared. Won’t the snake eat the frog? OR will the frog eat the baby snakes?

    I love the frog but not so much the snake, in my backyard habitat. Are snake repelents natural, and will they harm the frogs? IT says on the web that replelents just get the snakes all confused unable to sense the proximity of prey, so they simply leave the area that is treated with repelent. I cannot enjoy my garden with snakes running around. But I want to be sure the repellents will do no harm to the frogs or the earth or even really the snakes. Anybody know about this?

    I saw a gruesome image of a garden snake snacking on a very big frog on the internet.

    • Hi Mary–

      Thanks for your comment! That’s wonderful that you have a lily pond in your landscape…do you have frogs living in it?

      I will try and do a post about snakes and frogs…

    • I’m not a herpetologist, so don’t want to give you the wrong advice, but from what I’ve read, frogs are very sensitive to chemicals of any kind because their skin is semi-permeable. If you can, I would avoid using any chemicals. I don’t use pesticides in my garden anymore–even when I did use them, the bugs still munched away on my roses and the slugs ate my hostas. So I’m focusing on plants that seem to resist everything (geraniums work for me). While snakes aren’t the most appealing animals they do eat mice and other pests, and are part of the overall ecosystem, so perhaps it’s best to not to use chemicals to repel them….but if your garden is overrun with snakes, that’s another problem of course.

  3. John M. Kelly

    Your voice is needed so we can continue to hear theirs.. “Silent Spring” Rachel Carson’s book was so ahead of her time. Thanks for looking out for the little guys!

  4. Greetings from Canada:-)

    Jumping into the discussion late ….I’m a Canadian custom landscape designer and a horticulturist. I like to garden using plants that will tolerate our particular environment, which allows me to avoid pest and insect control – natural or otherwise.
    Note to Admin: When pest control fails to work it usually means the wrong control was used, or it was incorrectly applied.

    There are various ways you can reduce snail and slug damage without chemicals. Most pesticides work only if sprayed or applied directly on the pest.

    I love the idea of having frogs, snakes and toads around the garden. We don’t have a suitable pond or stream so our garden is not attractive to these critters, unfortunately.

    I understand Mary’s aversion to snakes, but they can be useful. I wonder if a fake hawk or owl strategically set out in the garden might be helpful? I believe that both these birds are quite partial to snakes as well as rodents.

    • Thanks so much for your comment. I admit I take too much of a laissez-faire approach to my garden, which resembles a jungle (and I live in a densely populated city). It’s true there are many ways to reduce damage from pests without chemicals. That’s a great idea about the hawk. In fact, I believe Gardener’s Supply carries many of these more natural remedies for controlling pests, which are worth a try. (I used their spiky plastic mats to control wandering cats, for example).

      Thanks so much for your input–much appreciated!

  5. I never knew about frogs being endangered. You would never know it if you came to my house. Although I do not own the property, we live on two acres of land and have a fabulous “protected” pond on our property. We have an entire nature preserve. We have tons of frogs, herrings, red winged black birds, snapping turtles, snakes…etc. My husband is always out with his bird book and binoculars keeping track of all the wildlife. The frogs at night remind me of the tree frogs we used to hold in our hands when we stayed in St. Thomas for our honeymoon.

    • Thanks for your comment, Robin. Not all frogs are endangered, but some species are experiencing declines or are threatened. That’s wonderful about your protected pond with so much wildlife! It does sound like a nature reserve… Let us know what kind of frogs you happen to see.

      Mary Jo

  6. Wonderful topics.

    As a nature activist, I have really appreciated your blog. I am just building a blog to promote nature awareness. I want to show some of your posts in my blog. Please let me know how can I subscribe some of your posts in my blog.

    Looking for more irresistible posts in your blog about such unknown remarkable subject to make myself rich of these beautiful gift of nature.

    Hope soon I will get a response.

    Thanks and regards,
    AVIK

    • admin

      Thanks for your comment, Avik. I’m so glad you have enjoyed our blog. Please let us know when your blog is ready! You can subscribe to our blog by clicking on the RSS feed at the top.

      Mary Jo

  7. Thank you for making people aware of the disappearance of frogs in the world today.
    I have had that feeling for a long time that frogs were vanishing. When I was growing up we lived outside of Seattle in a wooded environment and there were always frogs popping up. Now when I am visiting in that same area, I don’t see the frogs.

    Nan Avant

    • Thanks, Nan, for your comment. It is amazing that this frog decline has happened so quickly. In the past couple of weeks, I have been reading newspapers articles about efforts to increase their numbers in the Pacific Northwest, so that does give me hope.

      Mary Jo

  8. This site rocks!

    • Thanks, Bill… spread the word to your pals, and join our cause on facebook if you’d like.

  9. This blog rocks! I gotta say, that I read a lot of blogs on a daily basis and for the most part, people lack substance but, I just wanted to make a quick comment to say I’m glad I found your blog. Thanks, :)

    A definite great read… ~bill-bartmann

    • Hi Bill, Thank you so much for your support! We’re humbled by your compliment! Susan

    • Thank you so much for your comment, Bill! We really appreciate it!
      Mary Jo

  10. Your site was extremely interesting, especially since I was searching for thoughts on this subject last Thursday.

    • Thanks very much, we hope you will rss feed our blog and read future posts.
      Susan

  11. I don’t usually reply to posts but I will in this case, great info…I will add a backlink and bookmark your site. Keep up the good work!

  12. boaseviavioro

    Hello, it really interesting, thanks

  13. kempozone

    Im sure many of you are like me and one of the first things you do in the morning is head here and check out the new post. Along with seeing the new posts, I’m also always checking out the blog roll rss feed and watching them grow, or shrink sometimes. In one of my past …but all in all excellent site. Keep it up!

  14. Donnieboy

    Just wanted to drop you a line to say, I enjoy reading your site. I thought about starting a blog myself but don’t have the time.
    Oh well maybe one day…. :)

    • Hi Donnieboy–

      Thanks for your comment. Definitely start a blog! It’s fun and it doesn’t have to take much time.

      Mary Jo

  15. Alan Potter

    Hi
    I live in the coutryside Hampshire England in about 2 acres, quite isolated amongst fields and trees. I have my wildlife area of about 1 acre. I have living in the rather long grass very green frogs and many of them. As I don’t live anywhere near a pond or even water how do they survive and where do they spawn etc? Where do they go in winter?. I need to cut the grasses down during the winter and I don’t want to disturb the frogs. What is the best thing I can do?
    I would be most grateful for your advice.
    Very sincerely
    Alan Potter

  16. Alan Potter

    Hi
    I live in the coutryside Hampshire englandin about 2 acres, quite isolated amongst fields and trees. I have my wildlife area of about 1 acre. I have living in the rather long grass very green frogs and many of them. As I don’t live anywhere near a pond or even water how do they survive and where do they spawn etc? Where do they go in winter?. I need to cut the grasses down during the winter and I don’t want to disturb the frogs. What is the best thing I can do?
    I would be most grateful for your advice.
    Very sincerely
    Alan Potter

  17. […] remarkable and colorful animals are declining at such a rapid rate that they are being called the Earth’s next dinosaurs. According to the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, a third of the world’s amphibian species […]

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  20. Thanks Jenna, we published another post today, have a look. Susan